open source

Call Mashape APIs in your Windows 8 and .NET applications via Unirest

As proud contributors to the open source community, nothing makes us happier than getting feedback and support from developers who like to make things better. Shortly after we released Unirest.io, we received a ton of feedback from developers who would like to get a Windows 8 and .NET port.  Before we can even get to it, we received contributions from Michael Azarkevich and Michael Sync who ported Unirest to the two platforms.  To the two Michaels, a HUGE THANK YOU!  You rock m/ We have officially rolled them in with the rest of the Unirest libraries here.  You can also check...

Unirest for .NET (C#, VB.NET, etc) Desktop and Windows 8 apps

After the successful launch of Unirest, an open source lightweight http client library, we received a lot of requests for a C# .NET port on Windows Desktop and Windows 8.  Even before we got to work, we’ve received contributions from the open source community who ported Unirest to .NET. This tutorial will show you how to use the Windows 8 (RT) port of Unirest in your application (We will follow this up with the Windows Desktop port in a later post, but it will follow pretty much the same steps).  Let’s get started! NOTE:  We will be updating this...

Releasing Unicorn into the wild

UPDATE: We’ve got a lot of comments and suggestions on the ‘Unicorn’ naming. We apologize for the confusion and are working on finding a new name. Have a suggestion? Tweet us @mashape UPDATE #2: We picked a new name, unirest.io is up and running. UPDATE #3: Check our latest post on “Unicorn has become Unirest” Here at Mashape, we use a lot of open source. Our tech stack includes a lot of popular frameworks and libraries which have allowed us to rapidly iterate and develop what we feel is the best cloud API proxy and marketplace the universe has...

Another Google API bites the dust

In a shocking announcement Google has announced the end of Google Reader and its associated unofficial Google API after 8 years. So, on July 1, 2013, we will retire Google Reader. Users and developers interested in RSS alternatives can export their data, including their subscriptions, with Google Takeout over the course of the next four months. You can certainly appreciate the reasoning, it apparently wasn’t a popular product and drained valuable resources that could be used on products that actually turn a profit. Still many people are grieving the loss of a beloved service, while others believe with Google out...